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5 Ways to Improve Your Talent Attraction Strategy

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Contributed by Lindsay Stanton, Chief Client Officer, Digi-Me – HR West 18 Presenter

Nicholas Wyman, CEO of the Institute of Workplace Skills and Innovation, recently published an article with CNBC discussing the disconnect between the number of unemployed, underemployed and unfulfilled jobs in the US. He says that our nation is facing a “grave” problem.

Why is there a disconnect? There are not enough people with the practical skills that are required for the unfulfilled job openings. Wyman says, “It’s Time to Skill Up, America!” So now what?

For the first time in a long time, with low unemployment rates and rising hiring needs, we are faced with a candidate-driven market. Everyone is competing for top talent and passive job seekers are golden.

Here are 5 ways to improve your talent attraction strategy: Continue reading on the HR West Blog.

Tags:  employee  employee engagement  hiring costs  hiring strategy  hr  HR Leadership  HR Management  HR management training  HR West 2018  leader effectiveness  leadership  Recruiting  recruiting strategy  underemployed 

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Cultivating Diversity in the Workplace is Essential for Driving Innovation, Says Research

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Thursday, March 16, 2017
Updated: Thursday, March 16, 2017

The Northern California Human Resource Association (NCHRA), and Waggl—the most human way for organizations to crowdsource feedback—released new data from its joint “Voice of the Workplace” pulse on the subject of diversity in the workplace.

According to Voice of the Workplace, an overwhelming 96% responded that they believe cultivating diversity in the workplace is essential for driving innovation.  Responses were relatively consistent across various demographics including age, gender, region, and size of organization.  In addition, 71% of the participants said that they feel their organization is strongly committed to fostering diversity.  Among respondents under the ages of 31, 100% felt that diversity is essential and believed that their organizations are strongly committed to fostering it.

“Despite the current politics of borders and immigration, it is generally accepted that companies benefit from cultivating a diverse workforce, but it can be difficult to measure or quantify the impact of diversity on an organization’s ability to innovate,” said Greg Morton, CEO, NCHRA. “However, as this pulse indicates, we’ve all witnessed cases in which diversity has directly driven innovation by creating an environment where ‘out of the box’ ideas are
heard and encouraged.  We’ve also seen situations where, without sufficient knowledge or training about culture diversity, managers can inadvertently fail to cultivate trust
and respect in the workplace without even being aware of the consequences.  It appears organizations that continue to actively commit to cultivating ‘cultural intelligence’ will
be generally better equipped to innovate.”

In this pulse, HR West and Waggl also posed the question, “What is the biggest advantage of building a diverse workforce?” and distilled crowdsourced responses into a
ranked list. The top 3 answers were:

  1. “With a diverse workforce (age, gender, ethnicity, ability, etc.) one brings together a multitude of thoughts, ideas, [and] experience levels that has a greater potential
    to drive innovation, and promote constructive debate to move an organization forward.”
  2. “Having multiple perspectives encourages management to see things differently, and can help enormously with problem-solving. It also helps us to avoid ‘group think.’”
  3. “It takes diverse thoughts & opinions to create exceptional products and services, but more importantly it takes a diverse [and] inclusive workforce to build the
    foundational values of trust [and] respect which are the bedrocks of amazing and enduring cultures.”

Waggl is designed to help organizations to create a culture of innovation by creating real-time, two-way dialogue to be used to surface ideas, collect authentic feedback, and build consensus.  Unlike traditional survey and polling platforms, Waggl engages participants by asking open-ended questions where favorite responses can be “voted up.”
The platform enables fast, frequent, focused conversation on virtually any topic.

“Cultivating diversity is more important than ever, in our current era of business disruption and change,” said Michael Papay, Cofounder and CEO, Waggl. “The benefits of diversity become more evident as organizations start to open up lines of transparent communication and encourage authentic relationships between employees; creating an open forum to build connection, collaboration and alignment across the organization.”

 

Tags:  diversity  feedback  HR  innovation  leadership  Waggl 

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5 Tips to Attract the Right Culture Fit in 2017

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Wednesday, January 4, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, January 4, 2017

5 Tips to Attract the Right Culture Fit

Contributed by LaSalle Network
Join 
Allison Penning, Branch Manager, LaSalle Network 
at
Register today
Allison will present:  The Grass Is Always Greener: Overhauling Your Recruiting Strategy
HR West 2017 10:50am  -  12:20pm Tuesday March 7th.

 

 

 

 

 


In LaSalle Network’s recently published white paper, the company surveyed over 6,000 professionals to gather insights about hiring trends and challenges.
They found second biggest challenge companies identified, just after finding skilled candidates, was hiring candidates who fit the culture.

It’s now more important than ever to make sure the right people are exposed to your brand and understand what it’s all about.
If you can attract the right people to apply for positions, it makes the hiring process a lot easier.
Here are 5 tips to do just that:

1. Inject the company personality into job descriptions

It’s the first impression. The companies that successfully find ways to express the company culture in their job postings are the ones that stand out.
Use words or phrases that will resonate with the type of person you’re trying to attract. Be clear with the job requirements and expectations,
but remember that generic job descriptions will often attract generic candidates.

2. Design a “work for us” web page that portrays your brand and culture

Make it exciting. Use images and quotes from real employees. Give candidates an authentic insight into what it’s like to work in your office.
There’s no better way to help someone understand your culture than people who are living it every day.

3. Encourage employees to share company social media posts

It shows high employee engagement, one of the defining characteristics of great companies.
It communicates that employees are proud of what the company is doing and excited to share it with their friends.
Who doesn’t want to work somewhere people are personally invested in the company’s success?

4. Create an employee referral program

Encourage your staff to recommend talent. Good people tend to know other good people.
Moreover, employees that work with friends are seven times more likely to engage fully in their work, according to Harvard Business Review.

5. Attend job fairs at universities

It’s a gold mine for up-and-coming talent and a great opportunity to showcase your brand.
Show students what’s authentic and unique to your company, and when it resonates, you’ll know you’re attracting the right person.

For more information on 2017 hiring trends and challenges, download the LaSalle Network white paper report here.

Tags:  HR  HR West 2017  recruiting  retention  talent acquisition 

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Legalizing Marijuana: What's an Employer to do?

Posted By Editor, Wednesday, November 2, 2016


Contributed by Becky Barton

These days it’s difficult to avoid the election mania covered by the various media outlets. Given the major spotlight on the presidential race, you may not know that the potential decriminalization of marijuana will be on the ballot in several states.

California, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada will all weigh in on legalized marijuana for recreational use (also known as “adult use” and “non-medical use”) where it is currently approved for medical use only. Another 3 states (Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota) will decide on the future of cannabis for medical use in their states.

Supporters of the ballot measures see this as a boon to the states’ economies via increased taxes and job growth for cannabusiness people. We have seen 25 states and the District of Columbia legalize marijuana in some fashion, making a continued trend of legalization highly likely.

So what does this mean for business owners and employers? Marijuana remains illegal under federal law and the state-by-state variations make this particularly confusing. For example, within the subset of those states approved for recreational use, the amount an individual can personally carry varies.  As an employer, particularly a multi-state employer, these variations can be an administrative and enforcement nightmare.

Or do they? After all, alcohol is a mind and behavior altering substance that’s been legal for over 80 years and we seem to manage that in the workplace, right? Wouldn’t this be treated similarly? Well, it depends. Many laws clearly state that employers don't have to accommodate medical marijuana use during work hours or on company property while other states require reasonable accommodations for workers with disabilities (specifically as it relates to drug testing and adverse action).

The key is to know what is required by the states in which you operate, create an employment policy that complies with state law and enforce it consistently amongst employees of similar work groups.

The Bottom Line: Work with an HR consultant or an employment law attorney to navigate these unchartered waters. They should be watching how these new laws are interpreted by the courts and have your back should your policy need updating.

 

Becky Barton is the founder of People415, a San Francisco-based Human Resource Consultancy Firm helping companies navigate every stage of their growth.

Tags:  behavior  company culture  employee  employee communication  employee health and wellness  employee relations  Employee Training  employee wellness  healthcare expenditures  hr  HR Communication  HR law  HR Legislation  Human resources management. HR Leadership  law  leadership  management  marijuana  Policies  workforce 

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SSN Mistake Leads To Million Dollar Verdict

Posted By Laurie Pehar Borsh, Wednesday, September 14, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, September 14, 2016

By Robert Neale, Partner and Kim Thompson, Partner - Fisher & Phillips 

Neale will present, Hiring Foreign Workers: Visas, I-9s and Other Considerations, at the Global Workforce Conference tomorrow, September 15th in Santa Clara. If you are local to the Bay Area, and not planning to attend, it's not too late to register (at the door). Get more information here. Qualifies for 6 SHRM PDCs / 6 HRCI Recertification Credits - Global and General. Follow updates from the event on #NCHRAGlobalFisher & Phillips is a  Global Workforce Conference sponsor.

SSN Mistake Leads To Million Dollar Verdict

How Can You Avoid A Similar Fate?

A federal court in California recently ruled that a job applicant’s admission that he used a false Social Security Number (SSN) cannot be the basis for disqualifying him from employment on good moral character grounds. The court awarded the plaintiff over $1 million as a result of the employer’s misstep, which should serve as a wake-up call to all employers when it comes to handling SSN issues.

Employer: “Former False SSN = Lack Of Integrity”
Years ago, Victor Guerrero entered the United States as a child from Mexico. As a teenager, he used a false SSN to seek employment. Guerrero eventually became a lawful permanent resident and then a naturalized U.S. citizen. By legalizing his immigration status, he was able to obtain a valid SSN.

In 2011, Guerrero submitted an employment application to become a corrections officer with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). He passed the written and physical exams and met all of the other job qualifications.

But during his interview and routine background check, Guerrero admitted to previously using a false SSN to seek employment. The CDCR denied his employment application and sent him a rejection letter stating that his past usage of a false SSN showed that he was “not suitable to assume the duties and responsibilities of a peace officer.” The letter also stated that using the SSN showed a “willful disregard of the law” and a “lack of honesty, integrity, and good judgment.”

Guerrero filed a lawsuit against the CDCR in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, seeking damages based on a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He argued that as a Latino job applicant, he was subjected to national origin discrimination because the job application process required him to disclose that he had used a false SSN in the past. 

Court: “Policy As Applied Is Discriminatory”
The court held that while California law required the CDCR to conduct a background investigation to ensure good moral character, the “good moral character” hiring policy had a significant disparate impact on Latino applicants like Guerrero, even though it was facially neutral. In light of that, the CDCR had a duty to apply the relevant EEOC factors – which it failed to do – resulting in the court holding in favor of Guerrero on the Title VII disparate impact claim. The court ruled in his favor and awarded $1,186,307 in attorneys’ fees, $145,972 in expenses, and $140,362 in back pay.

Issue Has Become More Common
As an increasing number of formerly undocumented individuals obtain the legal authorization to work in the U.S, addressing false SSN issues has become a more frequent occurrence facing employers. In 2012, it was estimated that more than 600,000 undocumented individuals were issued temporary employment authorization cards under President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. 

Armed with valid authorization for employment, an individual is eligible to seek a valid SSN from the Social Security Administration. Once an individual has a valid SSN, a current employee, who may have presented a false SSN when originally hired, may now come forward with a new SSN and seek to update relevant employment records. 

Employers, especially those in California, need to tread very carefully when presented with evidence of a new SSN and information that the employee originally presented a fake SSN.  In addition to this recent ruling, the state has enacted laws that prohibit adverse treatment of an employee who comes forward with a new and valid SSN. 

Employers who consider past immigration status and associated illegal activity attributed to that status, such as using a false SSN to seek employment, may find that their actions are challenged as unlawful discrimination. As Guerrero’s attorney, Marsha Chien, said in a statement: “If discrimination like this is allowed to stand, millions of hard working people who are legally allowed to work in the U.S. will be left without the means to support themselves and contribute to our economy.”

What Should You Do?
You need to be aware of the interplay between employment discrimination laws and federal and state immigration laws, in particular when it comes to ensuring that employees are lawfully permitted to work in the United States. If you learn of a possible SSN discrepancy or mismatch, either through a letter from the Social Security Administration (SSA), a third party (such as an individual or a governmental agency), or from the employee directly, you should take certain steps to ensure accuracy in your own records and that correct information is communicated to the SSA. 

The first step should be to check internal records to ensure that the correct SSN is listed in the employee’s files. Taking prompt steps to correct errors or to address the situation will show good faith on your part and diminish any indication that you had constructive knowledge that an employee was working without legal authorization. You should never ignore information relating to discrepancies between an employee's name and SSN.

If you receive a mismatch or SSN verification letter from the SSA, you should check your internal records, communicate the information to the employee in question, correct your records (if there was an error), respond to the SSA as indicated on its letter, and insert any notes of explanation, as warranted, in the employee’s personnel file.

Depending on the credibility of the information received alerting you to the possibility of a false SSN, you may need to take additional steps, up to and including termination of the worker’s employment. However, you should seek legal guidance before making any decisions based on an allegation of using a false SSN.

You are encouraged to adopt a written immigration compliance policy and to train all relevant personnel on the importance of adhering to it. You should avoid “citizen only” or “permanent resident only” hiring policies, unless you are required to do so by federal law or based on a federal contract. In most cases, it is unlawful to require job applicants to have a particular immigration status.  

Finally, you should follow the fundamental rule of workplace law: be consistent with all employees and new hires. Following the appropriate I-9 practices will help you minimize the risk of discrimination charges and exposure for failing to comply with Form I-9 regulations.

Tags:  false SSN  Fisher & Phillips  global recruiting  global workforce  hiring  HR  immigrates  RecruitLoop 

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