Next Concept HR Magazine
Blog Home All Blogs
Next Concept HR Magazine focused on What's Next for what matters most to HR. Insightful and timely, it covers best practice trends and presents new ideas and concepts to keep readers up-to-date with the latest in our field. Voices from our nationwide community contribute to a wide range of topics. Articles include valuable practice resources, news and views to provide training, legal and legislative developments, info on quality service providers, and opportunities to form career-long networks and partnerships. Subscribe at: http://nextconcepthrmagazine.com/blog/

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: hr  NCHRA  HR Management  Human Resources  HR Leadership  leadership  employee engagement  employee  employee retention  workplace  management  company culture  recruiting  HR West 2017  HR West 2019  HR West 2018  hiring  HR West Speaker  HR Tech  HR West 2016  blog  employee wellness  HR West  Workforce  Engagement  human resources management  culture  effective leadership  communication  Karen Rodriguez 

Bringing Your Whole Self to Work

Posted By Editor, Thursday, May 16, 2019
Updated: Saturday, May 18, 2019

Contributed by Maureen Middleton, Next Concept HR Member.


May is mental health awareness month, which makes me acutely aware of my own disability. What does that mean as an HR professional? How do you balance the concept of “Bringing Your Whole Self to Work,” with the requirements of your position?

Continue reading the article here.

 

 

 

 

 

Tags:  employee health and wellness  HR Management  mental health 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Suicide Epidemic: Turning to Your EAP for Solutions in Times of Crisis

Posted By Editor, Wednesday, February 6, 2019
Updated: Thursday, February 7, 2019
By Timothy Mutrie, SVP of Marketing/IT at ACI Specialty Benefits and HR West 2019* speaker
It’s time to get real about mental health in the workplace. Talking about difficult topics, like a nationwide suicide epidemic, is just one part of the solution. 

Please read this important article to learn more about Tim Mutrie's session at HR West 2019!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags:  crisis management  employee health and wellness  mental health  workplace wellness 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

How to Reduce Stress at Work: Simple Strategies Anyone Can Follow [Infographic]

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Friday, March 31, 2017
Updated: Friday, March 31, 2017

There’s a silent killer in your workplace...

It lurks in the shadows, depleting your energy, sacking your concentration, and shaking your confidence.

Your co-workers talk about it in hushed tones (if at all),
and your boss is in denial of its very existence…

Its name?

Stress.

It’s no joke. Countless studies show that excess stress can
cause real physical symptoms like headaches,
upset stomach, increased blood pressure, chest pain,
and trouble sleeping.

That’s not to mention its role in mood disorders like
anxiety and depression.

This infographic below covers the alarming costs of workplace stress, the warning signs that signal you’re too stressed,
and 6 simple methods for reducing that stress
– so you can get back to kicking butt.

how to reduce stress at work infographic
 Jeff Murphy is the Director of Communications at SnackNation. (Obsessed with helping you create an Awesome Office.)


Tags:  employee health and wellness  employee retention  employee wellness  human resources management 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

All the Way to Wellness: Filling in the Gaps

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Thursday, January 26, 2017
Updated: Thursday, January 26, 2017
Contributed by Janice Litvinaward-winning keynote and motivational speaker, fitness expert, wellness speaker and workshop leader and writer.  
Presenting:
 All the Way to Wellness: Filling in the Gaps

 

March, 6  2017 10:45a.m.

 

As the corporate wellness industry comes of age several innovations are taking place.

Workplace wellness no longer simply means offering generic fitness challenges and nutrition classes, with some mindful meditation mixed in.

These programs are garnering an engagement rate of about 40%.

Workplace wellness has morphed into its own niche called Well-Being, with the notion that each and every
person 
who works for a company has a variety of wellness needs, not simply nutrition and fitness:

  1. Maybe they are stressed about finances.
  2. Maybe they are having trouble with a co-worker or boss.
  3. Maybe they've lost their passion for the job they've been doing for five years. 
  4. Maybe they have a new manger who isn't really savvy about handling difficult situations. 
  5. Maybe they are overweight and are pre-diabetic, causing them to miss work.

Whatever the case may be, in order for a person to be productive, they have to be healthy and happy. And in order for them to be healthy and happy, they have to be "well."

And in order to get them well, they have to be engaged in wellness. Their boss has to be engaged in wellness, and upper management has to be engaged in wellness too.

So wellness has taken on a whole new meaning, a whole new shape and a whole new purpose: the whole person.  Hence, the cultural shift from wellness to well-being.

Step 1.  Create a culture of wellness.  Creating a culture of wellness takes patience, planning and support from the top. 

Note: The C-suite must also be on board for this culture shift to happen!

Step 2.  Customize the offering. It is not enough to offer generic nutrition education with a one-size-fits-all weight loss program. 
When people are trying to make major life changes, like the way they eat, they need support, especially at the beginning. 
Furthermore, the programs have to be innovative and fun.

Step 3. The inspiration for change does not come about from a simple rewards program! That is not to say that rewards programs don't have a place in the puzzle.
Rewards programs do work, but these programs simply get people in the door. Motivation has to become intrinsic for the changes to stick. 

I will be discussing the latest wellness trends at HR West 17, March 6th - 8th at the Oakland Convention Center!
Learn how to get buy-in from the top and then how to strategize an engaging well-being program on Monday, March 6th at 10:45 am at my breakout entitled, "All the Way to Wellness: Filling in the Gaps." 

Tags:  employee health and wellness  Employee retention  employee wellness  healthcare expenditures  HR West 2017  Janice Litvin  workplace wellness 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Legalizing Marijuana: What's an Employer to do?

Posted By Editor, Wednesday, November 2, 2016


Contributed by Becky Barton

These days it’s difficult to avoid the election mania covered by the various media outlets. Given the major spotlight on the presidential race, you may not know that the potential decriminalization of marijuana will be on the ballot in several states.

California, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada will all weigh in on legalized marijuana for recreational use (also known as “adult use” and “non-medical use”) where it is currently approved for medical use only. Another 3 states (Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota) will decide on the future of cannabis for medical use in their states.

Supporters of the ballot measures see this as a boon to the states’ economies via increased taxes and job growth for cannabusiness people. We have seen 25 states and the District of Columbia legalize marijuana in some fashion, making a continued trend of legalization highly likely.

So what does this mean for business owners and employers? Marijuana remains illegal under federal law and the state-by-state variations make this particularly confusing. For example, within the subset of those states approved for recreational use, the amount an individual can personally carry varies.  As an employer, particularly a multi-state employer, these variations can be an administrative and enforcement nightmare.

Or do they? After all, alcohol is a mind and behavior altering substance that’s been legal for over 80 years and we seem to manage that in the workplace, right? Wouldn’t this be treated similarly? Well, it depends. Many laws clearly state that employers don't have to accommodate medical marijuana use during work hours or on company property while other states require reasonable accommodations for workers with disabilities (specifically as it relates to drug testing and adverse action).

The key is to know what is required by the states in which you operate, create an employment policy that complies with state law and enforce it consistently amongst employees of similar work groups.

The Bottom Line: Work with an HR consultant or an employment law attorney to navigate these unchartered waters. They should be watching how these new laws are interpreted by the courts and have your back should your policy need updating.

 

Becky Barton is the founder of People415, a San Francisco-based Human Resource Consultancy Firm helping companies navigate every stage of their growth.

Tags:  behavior  company culture  employee  employee communication  employee health and wellness  employee relations  Employee Training  employee wellness  healthcare expenditures  hr  HR Communication  HR law  HR Legislation  Human resources management. HR Leadership  law  leadership  management  marijuana  Policies  workforce 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 2
1  |  2