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Next Concept HR Magazine focused on What's Next for what matters most to HR. Insightful and timely, it covers best practice trends and presents new ideas and concepts to keep readers up-to-date with the latest in our field. Voices from our nationwide community contribute to a wide range of topics. Articles include valuable practice resources, news and views to provide training, legal and legislative developments, info on quality service providers, and opportunities to form career-long networks and partnerships. Subscribe at: http://nextconcepthrmagazine.com/blog/

 

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How to Turn Your Office Green on Earth Day and Every Day!

Posted By Editor, Monday, April 22, 2019
Updated: Monday, April 22, 2019

Every year, (today) April 22, 192 countries celebrate Earth Day in an annual push to activate the environmental protection movement worldwide. As consumers become more socially driven, corporations are challenged to address ways to make their operations more sustainable and eco-friendly. On Earth Day, companies should evaluate their sustainability efforts and ensure their offices are environmentally conscious. Besides benefiting the environment, many eco-friendly actions are good for business by reducing company spend and fostering office camaraderie and teamwork.

Discover four green tips for celebrating Earth Day and everyday in your organization.

 Happy Earth Day!

 

 

 

Tags:  earth day  employee retention  green office  HR Leadership  Workforce optimization  workplace wellness 

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The Suicide Epidemic: Turning to Your EAP for Solutions in Times of Crisis

Posted By Editor, Wednesday, February 6, 2019
Updated: Thursday, February 7, 2019
By Timothy Mutrie, SVP of Marketing/IT at ACI Specialty Benefits and HR West 2019* speaker
It’s time to get real about mental health in the workplace. Talking about difficult topics, like a nationwide suicide epidemic, is just one part of the solution. 

Please read this important article to learn more about Tim Mutrie's session at HR West 2019!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags:  crisis management  employee health and wellness  mental health  workplace wellness 

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Workplace stress endangers employee health, but your seasoned staff may be the answer

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Friday, September 1, 2017
Updated: Friday, September 1, 2017

By Gloria Dunn-Violin

Workplace stress causes untold physical and psychological harm to employees of all ages. And, the cost of this debilitating health issue is staggering.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) defines job stress as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker.

The American Psychological Association estimates that more than $500 billion is siphoned off from the U.S. economy and 550 million workdays are lost each year because of workplace stress.

>> Continue reading on the blog

Tags:  employee retention  employee wellness  workplace stress  workplace wellness 

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All the Way to Wellness: Filling in the Gaps

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Thursday, January 26, 2017
Updated: Thursday, January 26, 2017
Contributed by Janice Litvinaward-winning keynote and motivational speaker, fitness expert, wellness speaker and workshop leader and writer.  
Presenting:
 All the Way to Wellness: Filling in the Gaps

 

March, 6  2017 10:45a.m.

 

As the corporate wellness industry comes of age several innovations are taking place.

Workplace wellness no longer simply means offering generic fitness challenges and nutrition classes, with some mindful meditation mixed in.

These programs are garnering an engagement rate of about 40%.

Workplace wellness has morphed into its own niche called Well-Being, with the notion that each and every
person 
who works for a company has a variety of wellness needs, not simply nutrition and fitness:

  1. Maybe they are stressed about finances.
  2. Maybe they are having trouble with a co-worker or boss.
  3. Maybe they've lost their passion for the job they've been doing for five years. 
  4. Maybe they have a new manger who isn't really savvy about handling difficult situations. 
  5. Maybe they are overweight and are pre-diabetic, causing them to miss work.

Whatever the case may be, in order for a person to be productive, they have to be healthy and happy. And in order for them to be healthy and happy, they have to be "well."

And in order to get them well, they have to be engaged in wellness. Their boss has to be engaged in wellness, and upper management has to be engaged in wellness too.

So wellness has taken on a whole new meaning, a whole new shape and a whole new purpose: the whole person.  Hence, the cultural shift from wellness to well-being.

Step 1.  Create a culture of wellness.  Creating a culture of wellness takes patience, planning and support from the top. 

Note: The C-suite must also be on board for this culture shift to happen!

Step 2.  Customize the offering. It is not enough to offer generic nutrition education with a one-size-fits-all weight loss program. 
When people are trying to make major life changes, like the way they eat, they need support, especially at the beginning. 
Furthermore, the programs have to be innovative and fun.

Step 3. The inspiration for change does not come about from a simple rewards program! That is not to say that rewards programs don't have a place in the puzzle.
Rewards programs do work, but these programs simply get people in the door. Motivation has to become intrinsic for the changes to stick. 

I will be discussing the latest wellness trends at HR West 17, March 6th - 8th at the Oakland Convention Center!
Learn how to get buy-in from the top and then how to strategize an engaging well-being program on Monday, March 6th at 10:45 am at my breakout entitled, "All the Way to Wellness: Filling in the Gaps." 

Tags:  employee health and wellness  Employee retention  employee wellness  healthcare expenditures  HR West 2017  Janice Litvin  workplace wellness 

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The Future of Workplace Wellness Programs

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Thursday, June 30, 2016

Contributed by Dr. James Korkos


In California, nearly 25 percent of adults are obese, 12 percent smoke cigarettes, and 22 percent are not getting enough physical activity, according to the United Health Foundation’s  America’s Health Rankings® Annual Report. These negative health markers may have serious consequences and may increase the risk of developing chronic diseases, such as heart disease and cancer. Fortunately, many diseases can be avoided by adopting healthy behaviors.


That’s why an estimated 70 percent of employers already offer wellness programs, and 8 percent more plan to do so during the next year, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. 

 

Employers are investing in wellness programs because these initiatives can support their employees’ desire to improve their health and create a happier, healthier workforce while reducing costs for employees and the company.


Some of these wellness programs give employees wearable devices at no additional charge, helping provide a more accurate and comprehensive summary of the user’s daily activity, sleep patterns and other health markers. Fitness trackers – usually small devices worn around the wrist or clipped onto clothing – give users a snapshot of actual physical activity.


Employers nationwide are expected to incorporate more than 13 million fitness tracking devices into their wellness programs by 2018, according to technology consultancy Endeavors Partners. That’s important, considering a study published in Science & Medicine showed people tend to overestimate how much exercise they get each week by more than 50 minutes, and they underestimate sedentary time by more than two hours. People who use wearable devices are better able to monitor and hold themselves accountable for their physical activity.  

Here are five tips for employers to help improve and enhance wellness programs:
 

  1. Offer Incentives:  More employees may participate in wellness programs when companies offer incentives, which can include gift cards, lower health insurance premiums, cash bonuses, and discounts on various health products and services. Some programs featuring wearable devices enable employees to earn up to $1,500 per year in incentives by meeting specific daily walking goals, while employers can achieve premium savings based on participants’ combined results.  

  2. Gather Biometric Data:  Biometric screenings may give employees a better snapshot of their current health, including weight, body mass index and blood glucose, so offering them onsite at the workplace and at health fairs may encourage more employees to participate. More advanced programs can include connected devices, such as a Bluetooth-enabled wireless scale, blood pressure monitor or thermometer, which can transmit the participant’s vital signs to a case management nurse or wellness coach.

  3. Keep Data Secure: Companies that want to incorporate fitness trackers and other connected devices should first ensure the health plan will keep private data secure. This includes using the latest encryption technology, including medical-grade connectivity for seamless and secure data transmission. Management should never have access to individual employee data; instead, the health plan should report aggregate data to help the company assess the value of its wellness program.

  4. Generate Support: Set up a wellness committee with “wellness champions,” selecting leaders within the organization who are respected by their peers and can motivate others. Use email, promotional flyers and in-person meetings to communicate the goals of the program. Messages from executives will demonstrate leadership support and may improve participation.

  5. Track Results: Evaluate the success of the wellness program each year, taking note of employee engagement and medical costs. While engagement can vary, some companies have achieved participation rates of more than 85 percent.   

Following these tips, including the adoption of new technologies such as fitness trackers, may help employers and employees maximize the benefit they get out of employer-sponsored wellness programs – and improve the health of the company and its workforce.

About the Author

James Korkos, M.D., is market medical director for UnitedHealthcare of California.


Tags:  corporate fitness  employee wellness  HR management  workplace wellness 

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