The HR West Magazine Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
HR West Magazine Blog focused on What's Next for what maters most to HR. Insightful and timely, it covers best practice trends and presents new ideas and concepts to keep readers up-to-date with the latest in our field. Voices from our nationwide community contribute to a wide range of topics. Articles include valuable practice resources, news and views to provide training, legal and legislative developments, info on quality service providers, and opportunities to form career-long networks and partnerships.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: hr  NCHRA  HR Management  Human Resources  leadership  employee  employee engagement  HR Leadership  management  Workplace  Employee retention  HR West 2017  company culture  HR West 2018  recruiting  HR West 2016  blog  HR West  employee wellness  Engagement  hiring  HR Tech  human resources management  culture  communication  Karen Rodriguez  Workforce  effective leadership  California  conference 

5 Ways to Improve Your Talent Attraction Strategy

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Contributed by Lindsay Stanton, Chief Client Officer, Digi-Me – HR West 18 Presenter

Nicholas Wyman, CEO of the Institute of Workplace Skills and Innovation, recently published an article with CNBC discussing the disconnect between the number of unemployed, underemployed and unfulfilled jobs in the US. He says that our nation is facing a “grave” problem.

Why is there a disconnect? There are not enough people with the practical skills that are required for the unfulfilled job openings. Wyman says, “It’s Time to Skill Up, America!” So now what?

For the first time in a long time, with low unemployment rates and rising hiring needs, we are faced with a candidate-driven market. Everyone is competing for top talent and passive job seekers are golden.

Here are 5 ways to improve your talent attraction strategy: Continue reading on the HR West Blog.

Tags:  employee  employee engagement  hiring costs  hiring strategy  hr  HR Leadership  HR Management  HR management training  HR West 2018  leader effectiveness  leadership  Recruiting  recruiting strategy  underemployed 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Federal courts split over sexual orientation discrimination

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Monday, July 10, 2017
Updated: Monday, July 10, 2017

By Diane Buisman, Vigilant

A recent string of federal appeals court cases regarding sexual orientation discrimination has shone a light on an area of open interpretation under federal law. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, individuals are protected from discrimination based on sex, but the law doesn’t explicitly encompass protection based on sexual orientation. The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has long interpreted Title VII’s protection to extend to individuals based on their sexual orientation, rationalizing that being discriminated against for failing to conform to traditional gender roles is a form of sex-based discrimination.

Continue reading this article on the new HR West Blog.

 

Tags:  discrimination  EEOC  employee  employment laws  workplace 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Workplace Vampires: The Disengaged Employee

Posted By Editor, Laurie, Thursday, April 6, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, April 5, 2017

This video from HR West 2017 speaker Kevin Sheridan explores a third category of employee engagement: The Actively Disengaged.

Did you know? Thirteen percent of the workforce is actively disengaged - they are workplace vampires.

Discover the successful solution that can transform these "workplace terrorists" into productive and "actively engaged" members of your team in Sheridan's 2 minute (highly informative) video:

Tags:  company culture  employee  employee engagement  Engagement  HR Management  Managing Employees  millennial-retention  workplace performance 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

Judge blocks rule increasing salary for workers exempt from overtime

Posted By Editor, Thursday, December 15, 2016

Contributed by Karen Davis - Senior Employment Attorney, Vigilant.
Vigilant is a sponsor of

Judge blocks rule increasing salary for workers exempt from overtime 

A federal district court has temporarily blocked a U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) regulation that would have taken effect on December 1, 2016, and raised the minimum salary for workers who are exempt from overtime. The ruling applies nationwide. The judge’s action buys more time for the parties to argue whether the rule should be permanently placed on hold. We don’t know yet how long that will take, but it’s reasonable to expect it will occur after the change in administration on January 20, 2017. The incoming Trump administration could voluntarily withdraw from defending the lawsuit, and thus leave the existing salary levels in place. This is still speculation at this point, though.

Here’s why the court decided to temporarily block the implementation of the DOL’s regulation. The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) states that “any employee employed in a bona fide executive, administrative, or professional capacity” is exempt from overtime. Congress focused purely on workers’ duties, and didn’t establish a minimum salary. The DOL came up with the idea of a minimum salary for these exempt “white collar” workers. That salary is currently $455 per week and was scheduled to rise to $913 per week on December 1, 2016. (See our
5/18/16 Alert when the DOL published its new rules.) The court said the DOL exceeded its authority by establishing a salary that was so high that it overrode the “duties” test for the overtime exemption (State of Nevada v. U.S. Dept. of Labor, ED Tex, Nov. 22, 2016).

If an employer has already announced salary increases to employees who otherwise would have lost their exemption from overtime on December 1, 2016, the employer needs to decide how to proceed. If the increases were rolled into performance reviews, merit increases, or promotions, any reduction could create employee relations challenges. Any employer that communicated the increases purely as a legal compliance issue may be in a better position to explain why it won’t be implementing them. However, because workers may have been relying on any announced increases in planning their personal budgets, employers should proceed with caution. Also, keep in mind that any wage reductions cannot be done retroactively; employees must receive the full wage that was in effect at the time they performed the work. Stay tuned to see what happens with these overtime rules. We don’t know for certain what the court’s final ruling will ultimately be, or whether the new administration will continue to defend the lawsuit.

Karen Davis is an employment law attorney with significant experience providing advice and counsel to employers. She works with companies of all sizes, as a staff attorney for an employers' association. Connect with Karen Davis on Linkedin.

 

Tags:  DOL  employee  employment law  HR West 2017  minimum wage  Vigilant 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Legalizing Marijuana: What's an Employer to do?

Posted By Editor, Wednesday, November 2, 2016


Contributed by Becky Barton

These days it’s difficult to avoid the election mania covered by the various media outlets. Given the major spotlight on the presidential race, you may not know that the potential decriminalization of marijuana will be on the ballot in several states.

California, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada will all weigh in on legalized marijuana for recreational use (also known as “adult use” and “non-medical use”) where it is currently approved for medical use only. Another 3 states (Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota) will decide on the future of cannabis for medical use in their states.

Supporters of the ballot measures see this as a boon to the states’ economies via increased taxes and job growth for cannabusiness people. We have seen 25 states and the District of Columbia legalize marijuana in some fashion, making a continued trend of legalization highly likely.

So what does this mean for business owners and employers? Marijuana remains illegal under federal law and the state-by-state variations make this particularly confusing. For example, within the subset of those states approved for recreational use, the amount an individual can personally carry varies.  As an employer, particularly a multi-state employer, these variations can be an administrative and enforcement nightmare.

Or do they? After all, alcohol is a mind and behavior altering substance that’s been legal for over 80 years and we seem to manage that in the workplace, right? Wouldn’t this be treated similarly? Well, it depends. Many laws clearly state that employers don't have to accommodate medical marijuana use during work hours or on company property while other states require reasonable accommodations for workers with disabilities (specifically as it relates to drug testing and adverse action).

The key is to know what is required by the states in which you operate, create an employment policy that complies with state law and enforce it consistently amongst employees of similar work groups.

The Bottom Line: Work with an HR consultant or an employment law attorney to navigate these unchartered waters. They should be watching how these new laws are interpreted by the courts and have your back should your policy need updating.

 

Becky Barton is the founder of People415, a San Francisco-based Human Resource Consultancy Firm helping companies navigate every stage of their growth.

Tags:  behavior  company culture  employee  employee communication  employee health and wellness  employee relations  Employee Training  employee wellness  healthcare expenditures  hr  HR Communication  HR law  HR Legislation  Human resources management. HR Leadership  law  leadership  management  marijuana  Policies  workforce 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 7
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7