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Hosted by Greg Morton, CEO, NCHRA
"Industrial Relations," "Personnel," "Human Resources," "Human Capital" -- it seems as if the terms are always changing! This blog spotlights those individuals who are shaping the science around people and their purpose, in an unparalleled intersection of technology and humanity.

 

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HRCI CEO Amy Schabacker Dufrane Shares Thoughts on the Present and Future of HR

Posted By Greg J. Morton, Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Amy Schabacker Dufrane, Ed.D, SPHR, CAE, is CEO of the HR Certification Institute, where she focuses on developing collaborative long-term partnerships with individuals and organizations looking to create and deliver change around human resources. Before joining HRCI, she spent more than 25 years in leading human resources functions within nonprofit and for-profit organizations.

HR practiced well – which is what HRCI is all about – ensures that organizations hire the best, support employees to perform their best, and align their human capital with the organization’s business goals.

I wanted to hear Amy’s thoughts on the present and future role of HR and how HRCI is raising the bar on how HR leads business. 


What does a 21st-century HR organization look like? What skills beyond traditional HR subject matter knowledge do HR professionals need if they are to be successful?


The most important resource of any organization – and in fact, business as a whole – is its people. The most powerful way an organization can differentiate itself is through its people – because people are what’s behind every product and service. To be successful, today’s HR professionals must understand the business they work for. They need to understand what they are selling, what their organization’s challenges are, and what their customers and employees are saying. In short, we need to be business leaders who can think and strategize. 

We can no longer just be the “rules and tools” people.  

We need to be able to look at data from finance and marketing and think about HR from the perspective of how do we hire the right people and how do retool the people we have. 

We need to be able to ask, and answer, the right questions: What do we need to do from a strategy perspective? Who do we need to be here to make the changes we need to make, not tomorrow, but five years from now? How are we going to get there? Do we work with colleges and universities to identify the talent we need so we can put the right training and education in place? It’s about being able to make recommendations about what the future looks like from a human capital standpoint. 

We also need to think about how we brand our company. It used to be “come and work for us, we have great benefits and we will pay you well.” Now, to entice people to come work for you, you have to clearly differentiate your workforce and your workplace and your products or services as something that that’s interesting and appealing to be a part of. 


What would you say to a CEO about the importance of the HR function in their company?

HR’s role in business is so fundamental. Never before have we seen this necessity for HR and anything that is going on in business to be 100% in alignment. Good HR people who have earned accredited professional credentials perform better and are more invested in their career and their profession. And there’s large-scale research that proves that. Professionally credentialed HR pros are in it for the long haul. They are committed to making sure they understand the fundamental elements of HR and how to protect their organization and move it forward. This requires competencies in leadership and development and analytical thinking, all of which are elements of being certified at a more senior level.


What do you think about the notion that with all this automation and artificial intelligence, robots will replace HR? 

I think that technology and innovation are presenting opportunities that greatly enhance HR. Think about how we used to do performance evaluations. It was paper-driven, once-a-year conversation whose impact was pretty much limited to the sphere of the supervisor and their direct report. Today, we have a rapidly growing array of technologies that allow supervisors and staff to deliver, receive and integrate feedback continuously and across entire organizations, enabling managers, employees, teams, departments and entire companies to learn, adapt, evolve and perform at the highest levels. While automation has reshaped and eliminated certain jobs and technology can be expensive, even the smallest companies are becoming more and more sophisticated. Automation and AI are allowing us to work smarter. With AI we now have technology that helps us figure out how work gets done and who is involved. It’s HR’s job to figure out how to put that technology to work for us. This is very exciting, and I see this as HR’s challenge in the digital age – how to put technology to work for us to help our employees work smarter.

To learn more about HRCI, got to: www.hrci.org 

Follow (HRCI) on: 
LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/hr-certification-institute
Twitter – https://twitter.com/HRCertInstitute
Facebook –  https://www.facebook.com/hrcertificationinstitute
YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/HRCertInstitute?feature=guide

Connect with Amy: 
Twitter – @HRCI_CEO 
LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/amydufrane



Greg Morton is a corporate strategy and growth development specialist and Chief Executive Officer of the Northern California HR Association.

To comment on this article or ask (name of person interviewed) additional questions, please post below, tweet to @GregJMorton or connect with Greg on LinkedIn (using #CEOCorner with all social media posts).

 

 

Tags:  Amy Schabacker Dufrane  CEO  Ceo Corner  Certification  Greg Morton  HR  HR Education  HR Leadership  HR Re-Certification  HRCI  Innovation  innovators 

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Conversation with Michael Papay, CEO and Co-founder of Waggl

Posted By Greg J. Morton, Tuesday, July 12, 2016

A proven HR technology pioneer with over 15 years of domain experience, Michael Papay is CEO and Co-founder of Waggl, a San Francisco Bay Area company that provides a simple, cloud-based solution to help organizations listen to people, distill insights and make improvements. He is a frequent author and contributor to advancing the thought leadership around organizational learning and employee engagement. Papay believes that mutual respect and active listening leads to more meaningful relationships and productive organizations. 

Companies now want an engaged workforce and employees want to know that their opinions count. dynamic pulsing platform to enable focused communication, Waggl offers a solution that fits this ever-present need. I wanted to know what Michael thought about the role of HR and how it continues to change in conjunction with today's new technologies and trends.

Q:  What are some of the most pressing challenges faced by HR professionals today?

A:  The workplace has become extraordinarily complex, and is only becoming more so every day.  Most organizations aren’t properly organized to cope with digital transformation. Deloitte's 2016 Global Human Capital Trends Report surveyed 7,000 HR and Business Leaders from 130 countries and found that 92% of HR and business leaders believe that redesigning their organization is a top priority in the coming year. All of this complexity puts HR professionals in the difficult position of having to serve as the compass for the human beings that work in these organizations as they navigate tremendous change.  This requires the ability to have a real-time, two-way dialogue in which everyone has the opportunity to be heard, so that business leaders can access the intelligence of the entire organization.  It also requires the ability to communicate new ideas quickly and effectively, so that the organization can achieve alignment on key initiatives as they are introduced.

 

Q:  How can Waggl's pulse surveys change the way HR professionals approach these challenges?

A:  HR technology often aims to help with efficiency and improve processes.  But beyond that, pulse surveys can provide a way for HR and business leaders to really tune into the wisdom in the system. The people who are on the front lines dealing with customers every day hold a great deal of valuable knowledge, but in many cases, they don’t have a direct line of communication with executive management.  The traditional means of listening and drawing insights from a large group of employees has been the annual survey, which takes months to administer and is already out of date by the time it is received.  Similarly, most people want real-time feedback in order to improve their performance on a continual basis, rather than sitting down with a manager only once a year.  Pulse surveys are a great way for organizations to communicate more frequently and authentically with their workers, and also enable HR and business leaders to quickly surface ideas and achieve alignment.

Q:  In such a complicated business environment, does it really make more sense to add more technology and tools into the mix?

A:  As we head deeper into the new era of digital disruption, HR and business leaders will need to take a more active role in encouraging technical innovation in order for the entire organization to be successful.  According to a recent report from Cisco, IMD, and the Global Center for Digital Business Transformationby neglecting digital workforce transformation, companies are failing to build the capabilities that they will need to succeed in an era of digital disruption.  The report describes the steps that an organization can take to digitize its people-related processes in order to build a workforce that is highly agile, innovative, and engaged – factors that will enable the organization to create value for its customers, partners, and for its own employees.

 

At Waggl, we believe that works needs to be more human, and that listening to people is valuable.  Our utilization of technology strives to help strengthen connections, distill insights, and create a 2-way dialogue that allows people to contribute, and feel more engaged and motivated. Our aim is to make it easier for HR leaders to better manage the cultures  of their organizations, and to connect and engage with their people through a common sense of purpose. We build trust within the workplace by giving employees a voice and a set at the table.  The ultimate goal is to provide a better way for everyone to make a difference.

 ... a sponsor of HR West Seattle, July 15, 2016
Learn more about Waggl 
Follow Michael Papay on Twitter: @Papay3
Follow Waggl on Twitter: 
@waggl_it
Connect with Michael Papay on Linkedin
Please follow me on Twitter: @GregJMorton
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Tags:  CEO  Ceo Corner  Greg Morton  HR  HR Tech  HR West 2016  HR West Seattle  Innovation  NCHRA  Waggl 

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Meet Workday's Chief People Officer, Ashley Goldsmith

Posted By Greg J. Morton, Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Updated: Monday, May 9, 2016

Ashley Goldsmith is an HR leader and advocate for the way technology can transform an organization. As the Chief People Officer at Workday, a leader in enterprise cloud applications for finance and human resources, Ashley helps lead the company’s commitment to creating opportunity for all employees and maintaining a strong workplace culture – one that has gained both local and national recognition.

From its start, Workday has fostered an employee-first culture. The company firmly believes that if employees enjoy the work they are doing, the people they work with, and feel supported by management, then they will do great things for their customers to drive the business forward. Now more than 11 years old, Workday has over 5,200 employees, boasts a 98% customer satisfaction rating, and counts some of the world’s most recognizable and innovative brands as customers, including Nissan, Netflix, and Bank of America.

I sat down with Ashley to talk about how personalization is taking shape in the workforce, how Workday is enabling people to work the way they want and the impact on company culture.

I’ve heard you talk about the personalization of enterprise software. What exactly does that mean and how does it apply to the world of HR?

For many years now, cloud-based consumer applications have provided users with a very personalized experience. At heart, personalization is about removing the friction between intention (wanting to do something) and results (getting it done). No more spending time looking for a good movie to watch or turning on the local news in the morning hoping for information about driving and weather conditions for your commute—consumer applications know your preferences and anticipate when you need to receive certain information to make your life simpler and more enjoyable.

Unfortunately, this personalized experience hasn’t always been possible in the business world. Rather than removing friction, outdated technologies seemed to make relatively simple questions—headcount in a certain department, for example—such a laborious process that by the time you received the information, it was out of date and not very useful.

But that is now all starting to change as we are beginning to see the widespread adoption of cloud-based enterprise applications. An intuitive look and feel means that you don’t spend time wondering how to accomplish a certain task—you just do it. These applications don’t just reduce the friction between intention and results, but they provide mobile and analytics capabilities that give us access to data and information in real time to make faster, smarter business decisions.

From an HR perspective, these technologies can streamline how organizations recruit or manage a global workforce. And they can also provide people with a clearer career growth path within their own organization. Altogether, these technologies empower people in ways that weren’t possible just a couple years ago and enable them to work how they want to work.

Why is it so important to create an environment that enables employees to work how they want to work?

At Workday, employees are our number one core value. We strongly believe that this approach helps people feel more empowered in their role, gives them a greater sense of purpose in the work that they are doing, and creates higher levels of engagement with the business.

Enabling people to work how they want to work means that you are helping to remove barriers. You’re providing them with the tools they need to do their jobs more efficiently and effectively.

But there’s also an added bonus to this approach. As an employer, it helps you stand out from the crowd so that you can better recruit and retain top talent. People want to work in an environment that empowers them. They want to work in an environment that is people-focused and provides a personalized approach to their careers.

Can you provide some examples of how this approach can play out across different areas of HR?

One big way is through the democratization of data. As I touched on earlier, modern technologies and applications are making critical data and information available to the people on the front lines of the business, which is a far cry from how it used to be.

At Workday, this means that managers don’t have to spend hours meeting with their HR business partners to figure out headcount numbers or get updates on job openings. They already have that information at their fingertips. Instead, the conversations with HR can focus on more strategic topics like how to more effectively engage your workforce to drive the company’s growth.

Another area where this can be applied is in how organizations can help employees grow their careers from within. To do this means you have to be transparent and provide employees with tools that allow them to view other opportunities, learn more about those opportunities, and easily pursue them.

At Workday, this is particularly important given our continued growth, so we are rolling out a tool that will give employees a personalized view of positions inside the company that might be relevant to their interests. We are able to predict what jobs an employee will be most interested in by mapping the actual movement and success of other employees who held similar positions. It will not only help people see what moves others have made, but it will allow them to reach out and speak to those individuals who are a few moves ahead. This employee centric- view promotes retention and helps employees envision a future with their company.

Do you see a direct correlation between creating a more personalized environment for employees and sustaining a positive corporate culture?

Absolutely – I think the two are intrinsically linked together. To bring us full circle to the earlier discussion of personalization in the consumer world: Which products and services have the greatest growth and customer loyalty? The ones that are difficult to use, or the ones that remove as much friction as possible between intention and results?

A personalized environment is a direct reflection of a culture that is open and transparent. Creating opportunities rather than unnecessary friction for employees helps them stay engaged, motivated, and gives them a clearer sense of the contributions they are making to the overall success of the company. All of this together helps to create a culture that people want to be part of and inspires them to do great work for the business. 

Workday Chief People Officer Ashley Goldsmith on the CEO Corner with NCHRA CEO Greg Morton




Read more about Workday
Follow Workday on Twitter: @Workday
Connect with Ashley Goldsmith on Linkedin
Please follow me on Twitter: @GregJMorton

Tags:  CEO  Ceo Corner  CHRO  Greg Morton  HR  HR Blog  HR Leadership  Human Resources  NCHRA 

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A Conversation with China Gorman

Posted By Greg Morton, Monday, March 21, 2016

A successful global business executive in the competitive Human Capital Management (HCM) sector, China Gorman is a true innovator and futurist for the HR industry. She is a sought after consultant, speaker and writer who brings the CEO perspective to the challenges of building cultures of humanity for top performance and innovation, and strengthening the business impact of Human Resources. China is the former CEO of the Great Place to Work® Institute, COO and interim CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and President of Lee Hecht Harrison. We are also very honored to have China as a member of the NCHRA Advisory Council

And now, a conversation with China...

How do you think HR has changed over the course of your career and where is it going?
In its development from Personnel to Human Resources to Talent Management, the function is becoming a more integral part of the business strategy and leadership of many organizations. As HR practitioners transition to true business leaders (not partners, but leaders), Talent will become as essential a function as Finance, IT and Product. More and more HR leaders are coming from the business, and more and more business leaders are coming from HR. That’s the best outcome we can hope for. 

What three skills do you believe an HR person who aspires to be a senior practitioner should have?
1. Attain and maintain functional mastery
2. Attain business competencies and a reputation for being a business leader first, an HR practitioner second
3. Always, always have solutions to present based on your functional HR expertise and your business acumen. Be known for providing workable alternatives rather than just being able to identify the challenges.

There is a growing trend of Senior HR Managers moving into C-suite roles. What is the impetus for this and do you think this trend will continue?
This is an awesome validation that HR professionals truly can be seen and can operate as business leaders. CFOs and CMOs are routinely elevated to the CEO office. Although still not common, the growing incidences of CHROs becoming CEOs should give HR leaders confidence that the profession is on the right track.

You’ve been very successful. What led you to Human Resources as a profession?   
I’m the most famous HR person who has never been in HR! What I am is a successful business executive who leads businesses in the Human Capital market sector. I’ve aligned myself with organizations that bring talent solutions to business through HR. So HR leaders have always been my customer. And, of course, being the COO and Interim CEO of SHRM aligned me even closer to the profession. 

I love HR people. Despite (in many cases) being the Rodney Dangerfield of the corporate world, HR professionals are focused on the most important elements of organizational success:  the people. There is no organization without the people. There are no customers without the people. There are no products, innovation, brand or social impact without the people. People are the heart of every organization’s success and HR enables an organization to acquire, develop, and deploy the organization’s most critical resource. And as the economy and demographics continue to shift, HR’s contribution to creating sustainable business models is all about the availability and stickiness of talent. This makes HR’s value undeniable.

What has been your greatest professional accomplishment?
Building and leading teams to achieve more than they thought was possible. A leader’s true job is in creating and reinforcing a culture that enables humans to be their best every day. I’ve worked hard to ensure that every possible obstacle is removed so that my teams can outperform even my high expectations. 

Tell us more about what you are doing now...
All of my previous leadership positions – professional and volunteer – have pointed me to the intersection of organization culture, humanity and business performance. I currently serve on the boards of several organizations that are bringing products and services to the market that relate to this intersection. WorkHuman (powered by Goboforce), WorldBlu, The Workforce Institute at Kronos, and now the NCHRA Advisory Board all are allowing me to focus on this deep area of interest for me. Additionally, I write the popular HR blog, Data Point Tuesday found on my website (www.chinagorman.com) and have a strong public speaking practice.



Do you have more questions or comments?
Please feel free to post below.
Thank you for reading!

Greg Morton

Tags:  CEO  HR  HR Leadership  NCHRA 

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Welcome our New NCHRA Advisory Council

Posted By Greg Morton, Sunday, January 31, 2016
Updated: Thursday, March 17, 2016
 I’ve always taken to heart a quote from Aesop's Fables, “you are known by the    company you keep,” and have found that to be true both in my personal and professional life. This month I am thrilled to shine a light on “the company” NCHRA is keeping by introducing you to our inaugural Advisory Council… As you will see in the following bios, each member of the Advisory Council is an accomplished executive bringing significant experience and wisdom to their role on the council.

I’ve never been a fan of making decisions in a vacuum and value the opinion of our members and leaders within the communities we serve. One thing you will notice is, not all the council members are HR professionals. This was intentional and aligns with the philosophy that in 2016, we’re all in HR if we wish to get the most from our people, lead and collaborate.

I’m excited to have this particular council of innovators, futurists, thought leaders and accomplished executives to critique and weigh-in on the direction of the NCHRA. Collectively they represent the front edge of the metaphorical knife of change in our market, sharing from their unique vantage points where the world is headed, and how we can adapt to succeed within its direction. I’ll be looking for their opinions on a variety of issues, such as the topics we choose to cover in our many programs annually, identification of trends affecting our value delivery, help in securing the best speaker talent, and even as a sounding board for promotional materials and our brand positioning.

We’ve been fortunate enough to support the HR community for nearly 56 years and have seen much change and have adapted with it. And though I’ve only been here 4-months, I suspect part of our success has always been the company we keep. Please join me in welcoming our Advisory Council.

Tags:  Advisory Council  CEO  council  executives  Greg Morton  HR  HR leadership  human resources management  humanistic leadership  NCHRA  wisdom 

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